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The Glaciers of the Himalaya

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"The glaciers in the Indian Himalayas are divided in three geographical parts, commonly known as the western, central and eastern Himalayas. Put together, the mountain chain of the Himalayas extends for about 2,400 km and is fed by two dominant climate systems. The mid-latitude westerlies are responsible for the winter precipitation in the western and north western Himalayas, the Trans-Himalayas and the Tibet Himalayas. On the other hand, most of the southern and eastern part of the Himalayas experience pronounced summer precipitation which sharply declines northward across the Himalayas. The glaciers of the western, central and eastern parts of the Himalayas are, therefore, often described separately. The glaciers of the Karakoram Range in the northwestern Himalayas, as compared to others in the central and eastern Himalayas where a general negative mass balance has been reported, depict heterogeneous behaviour in the sense that many of them are dynamically unstable and prone to rapid advances or ‘surges’ that largely occur independently of the climatic conditions. For the last decade, on an average, a slight volume increase was detected. As per the glacial inventory of Space Applications Centre (ISRO), there are Â&




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    Staff Reporter

    In the central and eastern Himalayas, a general negative mass balance has been reported, whereas in the glaciers of the Karakoram Range in the northwestern Himalaya, heterogeneous behaviour is depicted.

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