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Ladakh: The India-Eurasia Collision Region

ISSN NO: 2347884-5

Vol NO: 19, Issue 25-26 No. 136-137

Ladakh, the Land of High Passes, has grown to be a favoured holiday destination among tourists in India, popularised famously by the 2009 blockbuster Bollywood flick, 3 Idiots. Situated at a height of over 3000 m in the north of India, these cold deserts hold within it a range of features—shifting sand dunes and sand sheets on the banks of the mighty rivers of Indus, Zanskar, Shyok and Nubra; pristine lakes such as Pangong Tso, Tso Moriri and Tso Kar; ancient hot springs of Panamik, Chumathang and Puga (Fig. 1) and the lofty Siachen glacier.

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Author: Satish C Tripathi

One of the most sought-after tourist destinations, the Trans-Himalayan region of Ladakh  also bears significant geoscientific importance with rock records dating back to the India–Eurasi




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    Author: Satish C Tripathi

    One of the most sought-after tourist destinations, the Trans-Himalayan region of Ladakh  also bears significant geoscientific importance with rock records dating back to the India–Eurasia plate collision. Moreover, the history of the evolution of the Great Himalaya is also enshrined in its varied facies. A heightened effort towards the conservation of these rich geological sites must be made by developing a geopark that can help reveal to the masses the rich, and often overlooked geological history of the region.

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    The author is Deputy Director General, Geological Survey of India, Hyderabad. sctgsilko@rediffmail.com. The article should be cited as Tripathi S. C., 2019. Ladakh: The India-Eurasia Collision Region, Geography and You, 19(25 & 26): 26-35

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