Water

Global Warming and Impacts of Glacial Meltdowns on Indian Rivers

Other the polar regions, the Himalayas follow as the largest deposit of frozen water in the world, especially in the case of Himalayan glaciers. Himalayan glaciers make up about 17 per cent of the Himalayas and about 37 per cent of the Karakoram Range. The water melted from Himalayan glaciers form the headwaters for many major river catchments in the Indian subcontinent. This discharge of headwater makes up for about 70 to 80 per cent of the melting of snow and ice from the highlands. In such a scenario,...

Environment

The Basic Possible Impacts of Climate Change in the Himalayas

Climate Change in the Himalayas is a major topic of worry for climate watchers in the Subcontinent and across the world. The Himalayas have the largest deposits of snow and ice in the world outside the Polar Regions and is often referred to as the ‘Third Pole’ and also as the ‘Water Tower of Asia’. Climate Change in the Himalayas: The Basic Possible Impacts The issue of Climate Change in the Himalayas is drawing forward many observations, with observations of warming in the Himalayas...

Water

Climate Change Severe Threat to Himalayan Glaciers

Many studies on wastage of Himalayan glaciers have come to the conclusion that Himalayan glaciers are retreating with varying rates of retreat between individual glaciers. This glacial retreat can vary between a few meters to up to 61 m/year. Also, mapping carried out of an area of about 11,000 sq km out of 40,000 sq km of glaciated area revealed that about 13 percent of the area has been lost in the last 4 to 5 decades (Kulkarni & Karyakarte, 2014). In this wastage of Himalayan glaciers or a negative...

Ecology

Climate Change and Antarctic Biodiversity

Not being residentially inhabited by human populations and instead being a place where largely scientific research is the mainstay, one would expect Antarctic biodiversity to be more protected than biodiversity in other, more populated regions of the world. However, this may not be the case for Antarctic biodiversity. The Status of Antarctic Biodiversity A study published in 2017 in the journal PLOS Biology by a team led by Steven L. Chown and scientists from Monash University, Australia has brought...

Environment

Climate Change and Marine Mammals in the Arctic

The effects of climate change are being felt in the Arctic more immediately and severely than in most other regions in the world. Even inferentially, the Arctic is warming at a rate that is two times that of the global average. The thing that is most visible and catches the world’s attention is the lessening of Arctic sea ice along with permafrost and the changing Arctic weather, leading to a rapid decline also in glacial ice in Greenland. However, climate change also affects Arctic marine mammals,...

Forests

Himalayan Medicinal Plants and Plant Biodiversity

Indigenous knowledge has great scientific value as it can be instrumental in efforts towards scientific raw data and also conservation. Such is the case of indigenous knowledge of Himalayan medicinal plants, which can be rooted in a culture’s heritage. This can be severely affected by climate change, with most biodiversity occurring up to an altitude of 2,000 m mainly due to rainfall and sunlight. An increase in rainfall and warming due to climate change could greatly affect plant biodiversity...

Environment

Warming Trend | Antarctic Climate Change in the Last Fifty Years

Antarctic climate change is older than most would assume, and Antarctica did not always have the climatic features that it possesses now. Antarctica had been much warmer in its distant geological past, such that there are fossils to indicate that trees grew in Antarctica at various geological times. As expected, Antarctica was placed in different locations many millions of years ago and with the movement of tectonic plates, this played a significant part in influencing Antarctica’s climate in the distant...

Environment

CLIMATE CHANGE | The KoppenTrewartha Climate Classification System

Basics of the Koppen Trewartha Climate Classification System Wladimir Koppen developed the first quantitative classification system for the Earth’s climate in his first model in 1900 (Kottek et al., 2006). Since Koppen, many different climate classification models have been developed, but the Koppen climate classification system (Koppen, 1923, 1931, 1936) with various modifications to its original form remains the dominant climate classification model. In contemporary times, the most highly...

Environment

Black Carbon as an Important Climate Change Challenge

Black carbon is a substance responsible for up to 40 per cent of the effects of global warming till date (Philadelphia Tribune, 2017), most of it made up of soot. Black carbon is a form of particulate matter that can be airborne and can be suspended in the atmosphere and travel thus. When this particulate matter gets deposited on frozen surfaces such as in the Arctic or in Himalayan glaciers and snow, its high absorption of the Sun’s heat causes the frozen material to melt and liquefy. The US Environmental...

Environment

The Environment and Atomic Policy of the UN

Changes in Global Atomic Policy The 2005 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded jointly to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Mohamed El Baradei in lieu of their work in preventing military use of nuclear energy and for their efforts towards the safest possible standards of the use of nuclear for peaceful purposes. The United Nations (UN) is aware that the UN came to fore at the dawn of the nuclear age late into the 1940s. The environment and atomic policy of the UN as such was greatly...